What Is The Temperature Target Of The Paris Agreement

The countries most affected by the effects of climate change will be low-lying nations, particularly vulnerable to sea level rise, and developing countries that do not have the resources to adapt to changes in temperature and precipitation. But prosperous nations like the United States are also increasingly vulnerable. In fact, millions of Americans – especially children, the elderly and the poor – are already suffering from the wrath of climate change. This is part of the Paris Agreement`s efforts to “reduce” emissions. Since analysts agreed in 2014 that CNN would not limit temperature rise below 2 degrees Celsius, the global inventory again brings the parties together to assess the evolution of their new CNN to permanently reflect a country`s “highest possible ambitions.” [29] From 30 November to 11 December 2015, France hosted representatives from 196 countries at the UN Climate Change Conference (UN), one of the largest and most ambitious global meetings ever held. The goal was nothing less than a binding and universal agreement to limit greenhouse gas emissions to levels that would prevent global temperatures from rising more than 2oC above the lower temperature levels set before the start of the industrial revolution. Warmer temperatures, both on land and at sea, are changing global weather and changing how and where precipitation falls. These changing patterns exacerbate dangerous and deadly droughts, heat waves, floods, forest fires and storms, including hurricanes. They also melt ice caps, glaciers and permafrost layers, which can lead to sea level rise and coastal erosion. Warmer temperatures also affect entire ecosystems, deterring migration patterns and life cycles.

For example, an early spring can make trees and plants bloom before bees and other pollinators are born. While global warming may be akin to longer growing periods and increased food production in some areas, areas already facing water shortages are expected to become drier and create potential for drought, broken harvests or forest fires. “We have the technology and the knowledge to make these emission reductions, but what is missing are policies and regulations strong enough to achieve this,” Watson said in an interview. “Right now, the world is on a path between 3 and 4 degrees C (5.5 and 7F) by the end of the century. Recognizing that many developing countries and small island developing states that have contributed the least to climate change are most likely to suffer the consequences, the Paris Agreement contains a plan for developed countries – and others that are able to do so – to continue to provide financial resources to help developing countries reduce and increase their capacity to withstand climate change. The agreement builds on the financial commitments of the 2009 Copenhagen Accord, which aimed to increase public and private climate finance to developing countries to $100 billion per year by 2020. (To put it in perspective, in 2017 alone, global military spending amounted to about $1.7 trillion, more than a third of which came from the United States. The Copenhagen Pact also created the Green Climate Fund to mobilize transformation funding with targeted public dollars. The Paris agreement expected the world to set a higher annual target by 2025 to build on the $100 billion target by 2020 and create mechanisms to achieve this. Implementation of the agreement by all Member States will be evaluated every five years, with the first evaluation in 2023.